Still Convincing Himself: The Bush Dynasty’s Worst Leftovers

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Back in August, John Ellis Bush gave a speech at the Reagan Presidential Library where he addressed foreign policy and the growing threat of terror from ISIS. The language was cushy, and focused on “support,” “international aid,” and “diplomacy” as solutions to halt ISIS and remove Assad. Apart from a few fun memes about ISIS recruiters on Twitter, and the tragic thought of ISIS’ black flag rising from Iraqi cities where American soldiers once died, the speech was an utter bore, which seems to be Bush’s norm: boring, boring, boring. In one of the United States’ most predictable (and fascinating, depending on how you look at it, and depending on whether Russ Baker’s book is factual) first-families, Jeb somehow finds a way to be the worst of the entire lot.

With a father and brother whose administrations were primarily defined by an obsession with all things IRAQ, Jeb seeks to straddle two drifting positions. On the one hand, family ties and allegiance to neo-conservative hawks encourages delicate caressing of the IRAQ invasion, and the expansion of U.S. interest abroad. On the other hand, Bush seeks a Reagan-man reinvention in the hopes that he will be seen as a peace-broker: someone to tear down walls and bring about international calm — “peace through strength; trust but verify.” With unanimity across parties on the failure of the Iraq War, Jeb acts like there is little left in the Bush foreign policy coffers, when the polls say something quite different.

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The New American Stratification

playground

“All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”
George Orwell, Animal Farm

           

As a huge fan of irony, the shutdown of Bernie Sanders attempt to speak at a Seattle event last month was simply delicious. The fact that he started off by saying “Thank you, Seattle, for being one of the most progressive cities in the United States of America,” only to have the microphone commandeered seconds later, was simply too perfect. I highly doubt Bernie recognized the connection between his statement and the following events which left him standing impotent, lost, and confused in the background as his ridiculous fedora-wearing goon engaged in a shouting match. This the kind of interaction which likely happens most often in the playgrounds of America’s schools. Replace the microphone with a shiny red bouncy ball and the picture becomes clearer. I’m sure this is old news for many people but I don’t really prescribe to the media news cycle. I laughed repeatedly while rolling the video back and re-watching the mayhem unfold. Sanders, the champion of every little guy and gal was finding himself on the receiving end of “sticking it to the man”, and it simply could not compute. How could the most progressive candidate for president be the enemy of minorities and the downtrodden? The answer is simple: if people choose to identify as victims, then there is no limit to whom they will ascribe to title of victimizer. There is no clear line in the sand, and that’s the mistake that many progressives make: assuming they are off limits.

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9/11 and Pearl Harbor: Getting our Tails “Whacked Off”

I had forgotten it was 9/11 today until a student wanted to know if we would have a shortened day. She was hoping the tragedy carried a holiday status. I found this rather disturbing: thousands of dead Americans and a Chinese student hoping to get time off school. But she’s a kid, so I cut her some slack.

I do not for a second, though, cut the American government slack for its actions post-9/11. This is the day that many will opine about the tragedy of that day, and while there is no doubt such reflection is well-deserved, it can easily blind us to the greater tragedy: what America has inflicted upon the world in the aftermath of 9/11.

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The Act of Killing: Reflections on Victims and Victimizers

I recently subscribed to Foreign Policy and just the other day got the first print edition. There is something pleasant and old-fashioned about getting a journal in hardcopy. Unfortunately this month’s issue isn’t online yet for some inexplicable reason, which is unfortunate because I was frankly startled and encouraged by an exchange between Joshua Oppenheimer and David Rieff. Both men have done work on the subject of genocide, international affairs, and humanitarian aid. While Rieff has written some books, Oppenheimer may be the better known of the two as his chilling documentary The Act of Killing was nominated for Best Documentary in 2012. All that to say, here’s some excerpts and thoughts from an exchange between Oppenheimer and Rieff.

Joshua Oppenheimer:  The task of cinema in intervening in and exploring theses issues is to actually immerse us in these problems… Most human rights documentaries… replicate that most basic form of narrative escapism, dividing the world into good guys and bad guys. That is reassuring because we inevitably identify with the good guys. But it’s problematic because it makes it difficult to understand—not in the sense to excuse, but to understand how human being do these sort of things to each other … If we don’t accept the uncomfortable proposition that every perpetrator of virtually every act of evil in our history has been a human being like us, then we actually foreclose the possibility of understanding how we do this to one another and therefore make it impossible to figure out we might prevent these things.

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The New Atheists (Mis)Use of History (Stupid or Sinister?)

Those in the West tend to favor the pronouncements of scientists too much. While works on theology written by scientists (e.g Dawkins, The God Delusion) are praised despite their theological vacuity, there is a general skepticism about non-scientists making any sort of claim on science that diverge from the scientific mainstream. This double-standard that privileges the scientist also permits that profession to write “reputable” histories as well; for example, the scientist Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel is widely acclaimed (by Bill Gates no less!) despite the fact that its thesis is historically dubious. This is not merely a science vs. theology issue. The conflict runs deeper:  science has accrued such a bloated reputation that people too often thoughtlessly embrace books, articles, and shows merely because they feature a man with a Ph.D. in biology. Little else can explain the popularity of the New Atheists. They are scientists, so we must give them credence, even when they begin speaking to matters out of their field of study. This is an intellectual state of affairs that bodes poorly for culture at large. The minute one sort of knowledge begins to trump all others you get a myopic view that blinds more than it enlightens. (The writer would also like to point out that such a critique is equally applicable to religious fundamentalists).

The West’s embrace of science has led to the inability to identify the sketchiness of the New Atheists’  historical rhetoric (among other things), which is something I intend to explore here by considering their metahistory (a grand theory of history and where it’s going) and then a specific example of Christopher Hitchens’ specious historical rhetoric in support of that metahistory.

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The Tow Line

There is a drowned boy on the beach in red and blue and his skin is pale,

We feel remorse at such a body: small and wet and frail.

But there is a line which runs back from him, back through murky waters.

Back to the crown above Africa, a crown of bones, a place of slaughter.

There the great Turk bombed the Kurds, although they fought the ones in black.

But we sat in silence saying nothing of the unwarranted attack.

But still the line runs on.

The man against his people made war, yet we postured ‘gainst the eastern sons.

They asked for help, and we sent them guns, guns which went to the black ones.

But still the line runs on.

They cast about in their streets and cried for freedom, and we joined them in the call.

But all we had was one red line when the bombs began to fall.

But still the line runs on.

We pulled down the statues and raged in rubble for freedom, or so we said.

Yet we could not count the cost of how many would be dead.

But still the line runs on.

It runs and runs and still it runs, yes still the line runs on.

And we stand as Argus with no Io, eyes that watch and rove and weep.

But do we see that thin tow line that runs into the deep?

Eugene Debs and American Socialism: A View from the Mountain

“Some part of the beholder, even some vital part, seems to escape through the loose grating of his ribs as he ascends. . . There is less of substantial thought and fair understanding in him, than in the plains where men inhabit.” -Henry David Thoreau

The above quote comes from Thoreau’s journey to the summit of mount Ktaadn, an existentially significant experience for the man. When he reached the top he was unable to gain any advantage of vision because of the heavy cloud cover. I find his language in the quote and the circumstances of it very significant. I think it says a great deal about perspective and how it is incumbent on circumstance. It is important to keep this general theme in mind, and I will come back to the concept at length.

There is no better day than Labor Day to explore the origins of socialist theory and its aims in nineteenth century America. I have read a fair amount from socialists both old and more contemporary and I find myself unable to be swept up into the fervor, for it is very much a movement based on constant revolutionary action; the American father Eugene Debs makes it very clear in much of his writing. I do not find the aims of socialism distasteful, since the cause cited is usually provision for every human and egalitarian respect and ownership of all property and the means of production. It is a noble goal, but nobility does not necessitate feasibility. If that were the case, then the Utopian Socialists would have been a world-sweeping movement and the oceans would have turned into lemonade as Charles Fourier Claimed. In order to get a complete view of socialism, I think it is important to first investigate the influences for the philosophy.

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